Greg Gabriel: Breaking down Washington State QB Luke Falk

One of the more interesting 2018 QB prospects, Falk can enter first-round talk with strong 2017

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FILE - In this Dec. 27, 2016, file photo, Washington State quarterback Luke Falk (4) passes during the first half of the Holiday Bowl NCAA college football game against Minnesota, in San Diego. Falk says he will return for his senior season. Falk made the announcement Wednesday morning, Jan. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 27, 2016, file photo, Washington State quarterback Luke Falk (4) passes during the first half of the Holiday Bowl NCAA college football game against Minnesota, in San Diego. Falk says he will return for his senior season. Falk made the announcement Wednesday morning, Jan. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy, File) — Denis Poroy

The Bears' former director of college scouting, Greg Gabriel has over 30 years of experience in NFL scouting and he breaks down the top NFL prospects and other stories around the league here at Pro Football Weekly. You can follow Greg on Twitter @greggabe

One of the more interesting names in the 2018 quarterback class will be Washington State’s fifth-year senior Luke Falk. Playing in the fast-paced Mike Leach spread, Luke’s numbers are second to none.

In 2016, he completed 443-of-633 throws for a completion percentage of 70, with 4,468 yards, 38 touchdowns and only 11 interceptions. In his first three seasons at Washington State, he has passed for 10,888 yards and 89 touchdowns, while throwing 25 interceptions and completing 68.8 percent of his throws. Those are highly impressive numbers. By the time the 2017 season is over, Falk will have thrown for over 15,000 yards and about 130 touchdowns. He will easily be the most experienced quarterback in the 2018 class. Being the most experienced doesn’t mean the best, especially when scouting QBs.

Falk has excellent height, standing about 6044. He has a lean frame though. He is listed as being about 222 but he needs to add strength and bulk to his upper body. When it is said and done, Falk should be 230-plus pounds.

Coming out of high school, Falk was not a highy recruited player. Part of the reason was because he transferred from his high school in Logan, Utah, to be closer to his quarterback guru who was in California. When he didn't like being in California, Falk transferred back to Utah and was declared ineligible for his junior season. His only offers were Cornell and Idaho. He then got a preferred walk-on offer from Washington State and chose to enroll there.

Falk is a marginally good athlete. He shows adequate quickness and speed. I don’t feel he will break 4.80 when he is timed. His foot quickness is good and he shows some maneuverability in the pocket and can extend plays to some extent. He takes a lot of hits, though, as his offensive line is just average.

Falk has a quick overhand delivery and spins the ball well with good velocity. He can make any NFL-type throw. Though NFL-type throws are not a real part of the Washington State offense, you see enough of them to know he can make those throws. He has good-to-real good overall arm strength and can easily throw the ball accurately down field 50 to 55 yards.

When he is able to set his feet, Falk shows excellent accuracy and ball placement. When hurried (and that is often), he has a tendency to throw off his back foot, and then the ball will sail on him some. When he remains true to his mechanics, he throws the ball very well.

The Washington State offense is a fast-paced spread scheme but not really a half-field offense. Falk is able to go through a minor progression and is a consistently good decision-maker. He will force some throws, but the numbers show that he does not turn the ball over that often.

Falk's biggest problem once he gets to the NFL will be adapting to NFL style offense and learning to play from under center. He holds the ball high and has a tight throwing motion. He can get the ball out of his hands quickly once he makes a decision.

Going forward, I am interested in seeing how Falk improves from the 2016 season. He has some interesting traits and a lot of playing experience. At this time, I don’t think that he is a “lock” first-round pick, but by the end of the 2017 college season, he will be in the conversation and maybe even secure himself a first-round slot. There is a lot to like about his game but Falk still needs to improve, as well as get a little bigger and stronger. Needless to say, he is a very solid prospect at this time.