Sean McVay reportedly frontrunner for Los Angeles Rams opening following second interview

Rams could have any NFL's youngest roster and head coach if they hire McVay

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Washington Redskins offensive coordinator Sean McVay stands on the sideline during an NFL preseason football game against the Cleveland Browns, Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)
Washington Redskins offensive coordinator Sean McVay stands on the sideline during an NFL preseason football game against the Cleveland Browns, Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard) — David Richard

The Rams have opened each of the past five seasons with the NFL's youngest roster. They may begin 2017 with the league's youngest roster and coach.

Washington offensive coordinator Sean McVay, 30, had his second interview with the Rams on Wednesday, USA TODAY Sports' Tom Pelissero first reported, after initially meeting with the club last week. McVay, who's overseen the growth of Kirk Cousins and a Washington offense that ascended from No. 17 to third overall from 2015-16, is considered the favorite to replace Jeff Fisher, per multiple outlets.

ESPN's Adam Schefter tweeted Wednesday McVay's top choice for defensive coordinator is none other than Wade Phillips, the 2015 PFWA assistant coach of the year for his spectacular work with the Super Bowl 50 champion Broncos. John Elway just hired Vance Joseph as the Broncos' new head coach, likely signaling the exit of Phillips, who has an expiring contract. Phillips may have had the best ingredients in the league to cook up his ferocious Broncos defenses the past two seasons, but with Aaron Donald, Robert Quinn, Alec Ogletree and others, the Rams have no shortage of players who would mesh well with Phillips' aggressive upfield 30-front 'D.'

If the relatively unknown McVay needed additional clout during an interview process that's also included a visit with the 49ers, having one of the game's most highly regarded assistants penciled in as a coordinator is undoubtedly impressive.

So too is McVay's Washington offense, a West Coast spread system that helped Cousins earn the PFWA's 2015 co-most improved player award and a $20 million franchise tender from the club last offseason. McVay's system is explosive, yet also considered quarterback-friendly: two important traits the Rams, with 2016 top pick Jared Goff and the NFL's most anemic scoring offense, covet.

In nearly five full seasons under Fisher, the Rams never finished higher than 21st in scoring, with an average ranking of 25th. In the 2016 season, they managed a league-low 23 combined passing and rushing touchdowns — six fewer than Cousins alone totaled.

McVay's candidacy with the Rams almost certainly hinges on his belief in Goff and Todd Gurley, and seeing the way he and Jay Gruden maximized lesser pedigreed players like Cousins and Rob Kelley makes this an intriguing fit.

Last offseason, the Dolphins hired Adam Gase, at the time 37, as the NFL's youngest head coach, and he led them to a surprising 10-6 mark and wild-card berth in one of the season's better coaching jobs. The Raiders in 2007 hired 31-year-old Lane Kiffin, the youngest-ever coach, and he went 4-12 in Year One and began his second season just 1-3 before his dismissal.

Philly Voice's Jimmy Kempski, who tracks the average age of every roster every offseason, had the Rams at an average of 25 years old after 2016 cut-down days.