Cardinals' play beyond embarrassing

Posted Dec. 10, 2012 @ 11:29 p.m.
Posted By Mark Brown

TEMPE, Ariz. — Now, this is to the point of beyond embarrassment.

It's one thing to play competitively and be beaten. It's an entirely different set of circumstances to lose the way the Cardinals have lost during their current nine-game losing streak.

It is equally upsetting to hear coach Ken Whisenhunt continue to make excuses for players who can not make plays and for an offense which remains a total shame.

If the debacle against the Jets in Week 13 was the dramatic signal to a forgotten autumn,  then the 58-0 defeat to the Seattle this past Sunday had the effect of being buried alive. The Seahawks pitched in with their shovels and, despite a team desperate for anything positive and pleading for mercy, continued to heap dirt on this lifeless corpse.

"Let me start out by saying I apologize to our fans and everybody associated with the organization," Whisenhunt said after the Seattle game. "That was embarrassing. We owe to give them a better product."

That's putting it mildly, coach.

As with the previous weeks, the offense was Dead on Arrival.

The change of quarterback from rookie Ryan Lindley to John Skelton as starter was seamless. The offensive malaise simply moved from one bad signal caller to the next.

Against the Jets, Arizona managed only 137 yards of total offense and this past Sunday, gathered but 154 yards for the entire 60 minutes. That's 291 yards in the past two games, and that number should represent at least passing yardage from a respectable quarterback on an average NFL Sunday.

Instead, the Cardinals' running game picked up 43 yards against Seattle, and the combination of Lindley and Skelton threw for 133 yards. Plus, the shutout was the first by the Cardinals since a 38-0 defeat to Seattle in 2003 and the nine-game slide is the longest for this franchise since the Chicago Cardinals dropped nine in a row in 1944.

As well, eight turnovers resulted directly in three Seattle touchdowns and the Cardinals were buried by halftime.

Whisenhunt said the defeat was exacerbated by the fact that his usually reliable defense surrendered 493 yards of total offense to the Seahawks, and 284 yards on the ground.

Overall, a desperate situation seems out of control. This is becoming a new definition of Murphy's Law because when players, coaches, team officials and fans think this franchise hit bottom, there appears new revelations to the opposite.

Through these terrible times, Whisenhunt continues to be haunted by a QB situation that now borders on the comical.

When New York sportswriter Jimmy Breslin wrote a book on the Mets' first year entitled, "Can't Anyone Here Play This Game?" he could have easily had the 2012 Arizona Cardinals in mind. The ineptitude continues to be pervasive, mistakes pile up like an avalanche out of control, and Whisenhunt continues with the party line to stay positive.

Whisenhunt's frustration is obvious, which is why he turned the tables on a reporter after the Seattle game.

Because of the ineffectiveness of both Skelton and Lindley, a reporter asked Whisenhunt if he decided on his quarterback for this week's game at home against Detroit.

"Do you play?" the coach asked, and therein lays the aggravation and abject failure of this lost season.