Seahawks' road woes continue

Posted Sept. 20, 2010 @ 11:04 p.m.
Posted By Dan Arkush

There are a ton of things different about the Seahawks this season under new head coach Pete Carroll, but one thing remains the same: Seattle still stinks on the road. Self-inflicted wounds proved deadly in Denver, with four turnovers, seven penalties and lots of questionable decisions contributing to an ugly 31-14 loss to the Broncos that made the Seahawks' surprising season-opening rout over the division-rival Niners seem like a distant memory.

The Seahawks' road woes picked up right where they left off last season, when all seven of their losses away from home were of the double-digit variety.

The PFW spin

Taking into account how much this team has been turned over by Carroll and new GM John Schneider, occasional swarms of mistakes like those in Denver should not be considered all that surprising. A lack of cohesion often leads to dumb decisions and ill-timed penalties, and there were plenty of both on Sunday.

It's hard not to point a finger at QB Matt Hasselbeck, who was a far cry from the soild starter who registered an impressive 108.3 passer rating in Week One. Against Denver, Hasselbeck had an abysmal 51.3 QB rating with three interceptions, including two inside the Denver 10-yard line. He threw a pick on the game's opening series for the second week in a row and now has 14 interceptions in his last six games — a troubling stat that will no doubt increase the cries for Charlie Whitehurst to come to the rescue. It's a little too early, one would think, for the team to give up on Hasselbeck, but he needs to start making surer throws and better decisions soon, or else.

There were other road atrocities worth noting. The defense, for instance, rested in Denver. After limiting the Niners to only 1-of-15 third down conversions in Week One, they allowed Kyle Orton and the Broncos to convert a whopping 14-of-20 third downs.

And why in the world Carroll waited until this game to unleash rookie Golden Tate, who was inactive in Week One even though team insiders raved about his ability to almost always make something happen every time he touches the ball, is a question worth pondering more than a little. Wouldn't have Tate, who had a nifty 63-yard punt return as well as a 52-yard catch in Denver, been a better choice as the starting punt returner than rookie Walter Thurmond, who muffed a punt, leading to the Broncos' first score?

Clearly, that was one of many golden opportunities gone astray in the Seahawks' very forgettable Week Two performance.